Who is your muse?

Thoughts, Writing

I write for you, muse.

Play on, invisible harps, play on in my heart

Please visit me muse, ache of love.

I cannot go on without you,

Do not die, my unrequited muse

Dante Alighieri & Beatrice di Folco Portinari

Do not leave me muse and come back

Elizabeth Taylor & Richard Burton

Do not love the image of us, the muse, more than the reality

Jean-Luc Godard & Anna Karina

You, my wonder wild we kiss

Sweetheart, I come.

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Reveries

Thoughts

Is it possible to love the person you haven’t met yet? In most cases you don’t know who they are, only that they exist, and more likely than not, in a far away land, because that is how the Universe works; it makes you work for good things in life, and love is no exception. Nothing ever comes easy, does it? At least nothing that is worth it.

And what about Time? Does Time allow the two of you to meet before it is too late? Of course Time does, as there is all the Time in the world. But then Time’s relative named Circumstance comes in to play; Circumstance gets in the way by sending other people to float around the ether of your world to distract you from the pearl in the east–the pearl being your love.

Do not worry, Serendipity will overrule and bring you two together when least expected. Eventually, that is. Are you willing to wait? I am.

what makes my panties wet

books, Thoughts, Writing

Don’t get me wrong, I hold great respect for romance writers, and needless to say, all writers no matter the genre–especially self-published (how many hats do we take on?) I love the passion of readers, and I also know how difficult it is to publish prolifically like many authors I’ve seen consistently pull off week after week, month after month, year after year. You (author) are SO inspiring to me! You help me to aspire to work even harder at my craft (alongside the inspiration and genius of the literary greats, but that’s another blog post).

Specifically in the romance/erotic romance genre, I’ve noticed a trend that I don’t exactly understand what the mass appeal of it is (and I can only assume it started with books featuring Fabio on the cover, and a certain number of Shades of you know which color) …

The trend is: alpha male (dominant man who knows how to get what he wants, is outspoken, confident, generally non-emotional, usually is a CEO with a billion dollars, and after much contention with his machismo inner turmoil, only melts at the knees of the woman he has conquered), and his submissive female counterpart (there’s never a female billionaire CEO, usually she isn’t that interesting, and if she isn’t completely submissive, it is made clear that she is definitely more meek in comparison to the man, made most apparently by her following his lead).

I get it. Write for your audience, right? Why change what works, especially in such a defined genre? I understand that a large number of readers of this genre read this particular genre to ESCAPE (I mean, why else is a HEA even a thing?) And that’s fine–again, I get it. Hey! I like happy endings. I also like endings that make sense, be it happy or not. I also understand that sometimes The Sound and the Fury just isn’t good airplane or bedtime reading material.

But as writers, why can’t we occasionally–if not usually–challenge ourselves and our readers by defying stereotypes in order to pave a path for new stories, characters, and tropes?

Here’s a question: am I the only one who gets wet over a sensitive, intelligent, shy, and physically imperfect (not made of muscles and/or no perfectly sculpted mountain man beard), yet cute, man? Or how about a confident, smart, headstrong, beautiful (still not physically perfect), well-read woman who has a potty mouth and enjoys a good fuck?

When I wrote Taking Wilde, my goal was to satisfy what romance/erotic romance readers expect, while also (hopefully) defying expectations and transcending what it means to escape into a world of relationships, love, work, drama, and sex (within the context of a slightly absurd premise). I wrote a novella that I would be interested in reading; I love reading about SEX, I love LOVE, and I really enjoy REAL PEOPLE.

Cara Delevigne and David Kross were my muses for the two main characters in Taking Wilde. Delevingne and Kross are hot in my opinion, but not for the most obvious reason (physicality). There’s something strong, witty, and zero-fucks-given in Delevigne that is a turn on. And what isn’t adorable about Kross? His humble and seemingly shy demeanor alone makes me melt. Oh, do tell me you’ve seen/read The Reader.

Why can’t we all try it? Something new. Who knows … maybe one of these days I’ll take on the alpha male-submissive female challenge. Perhaps I was on my way to doing so with 40-Love.

Quick Thoughts on Bi-Sexuality

Thoughts, Writing

In my next book Possessing Wilde (now available to pre-order), subjects include bi-sexuality and a ménage à trois.

Personally, I identify as bi-sexual, and I fully realize the stigmas that occur when you even tell someone that you are bi (what, she’s so horny that she can’t just choose a gender and stick with it? Oh, this just must be a phase. (Trust me, I’ve heard both of those)).

Unfortunately, bi-sexuality (like any sexual orientation outside of heteronormativity) comes with many stereotypes, including (but certainly not limited to): promiscuity, fickleness, and indecisiveness.

I really am not PC, I just want my readers and any others who are reading this to know that it is not my intention to paint individuals who identify as bi as these sex-craved people who engage in a ménage à trois as regularly as drinking water. This event just happens to be a part of Possessing Wilde (I think it’s hot, sexy, and adds to the story).

My characters represent an assortment of sexual orientations: Clarence is heterosexual, Adele previously identified as heterosexual (after meeting Celine, she realizes she doesn’t really want to be labeled as anything), and Celine is bi-sexual.

Whatever you identify as–whether it be heterosexual, bi-sexual, homosexual, pansexual, a-sexual, sexual fluidity, and any other sexual orientations I am missing–it’s all good! Have fun, and be you.